Latest update 13.08.2019 Category: Literature

Anne Bronte and Agnes Grey ~ Governess Situation. essay

Anne Brontë Completely on en.wikipedia.org

Around 1831, when Anne was eleven, she and Emily broke away from Charlotte and Branwell to create and develop their own fantasy world, "Gondal". Anne was particularly close to Emily especially after Charlotte's departure for Roe Head School, in January 1831.[29] When Charlotte's friend Ellen Nussey visited Haworth in 1833, she reported that Emily and Anne were "like twins", "inseparable companions". She described Anne: "Anne, dear gentle Anne was quite different in appearance from the others, and she was her aunt's favourite. Her hair was a very pretty light brown and fell on her neck in graceful curls. She had lovely violet-blue eyes; fine pencilled eyebrows and a clear almost transparent complexion. She still pursued her studies and especially her sewing, under the surveillance of her aunt."[30][31] Anne took lessons from Charlotte, after she returned from Roe Head. Charlotte returned to Roe Head as a teacher on 29 July 1835 accompanied by Emily as a pupil; Emily's tuition was largely financed by Charlotte's teaching. Within a few months, Emily unable to adapt to life at school was physically ill from homesickness. She was withdrawn from school by October and replaced by Anne.

Agnes Grey Reader’s Guide Completely on penguinrandomhouse.com

But Agnes Grey is hardly a didactic novel. By rendering the daily life of her protagonist with such vivid detail, and in a tone that is coolly restrained, Brontë lets Agnes Grey’s experience speak for itself. Abused by the children she is enjoined to teach, treated with derisive arrogance by the men and women who employ her, Agnes lives in a world without friends, adrift between the servant and the genteel classes, at home in neither. But it is the cruelty, vanity, and moral emptiness of the upper classes that the novel exposes most unsparingly. In her first position, with the Bloomfield family, young master Tom is shown to be a budding sociopath who delights in torturing helpless animals and is spurred on in this activity by his elders, who either merely condone the behavior or actively applaud it. When Agnes intervenes to spare a nestful of baby birds from Tom’s sadism, Uncle Robson says: “Curse me, if I ever saw a nobler little scoundrel than that. He’s beyond petticoat government already;—by G—, he defies his mother, granny governess, and all! Ha, ha, ha. Never mind, Tom, I’ll get you another brood tomorrow’” (p. 105). In her second place of employment, with the Murrays, Agnes tries and fails to reform young Rosalie, who derives a similar enjoyment from causing pain. The beautiful Miss Murray delights in playing the coquet with her suitors, manipulating their affections for the sole purpose of dashing their hopes and reveling in the suffering she causes them. When not actively cruel, Rosalie is often deeply unfeeling, a woman who regards her servants as “mere automatons” (p. 233). In such a world, a governess is considered only slightly more human than a servant and only slightly more deserving of sympathy than a nestful of baby birds.

Anne Bronte's Agnes Grey and the Critics Essay Completely on 123helpme.com

- Very little is known about Anne Bronte’s life. There are many recordings on her experiences with her published works, but few recordings are around of her daily life and feelings, in her own words or those of witnesses. The few cases in which her own recorded impressions can be compared with those of her sisters, Charlotte and Emily, imply that they all did not necessarily believe and feel the same way about certain situations. In the readings The Oxford Guide too British Women Writers Anne Bronte was brought up with her six siblings in the personage at Haworth by her father and her mother’s elder sister “Aunt Barnwell.” The personage life was an enclosed world, which few visitors interru... [tags: Biography, English Literature]

Agnes Grey Grey, Agnes - Essay Completely on enotes.com

occasion she finds it necessary to kill a nest of birds to prevent the youngest boy, Tom, from torturing them—Agnes is shortly given notice. She soon locates a new governess position, gaining employment with the Murray family of Horton Lodge. Treated with little respect by her aristocratic employers, Agnes discovers that her new pupils—Charles, John, Matilda, and Rosalie, who range in age from nine to sixteen—are only a slight improvement over their unprincipled predecessors. Confronted with these troubles, Agnes encounters Edward Weston, the new curate in Horton, and swiftly falls in love with the simple, sincere, and unassuming young cleric. Meanwhile, the Murray boys depart for school, leaving her in charge of only Matilda and Rosalie. Time passes and the materialistic and flirtatious Rosalie, now eighteen, leaves Agnes's care. Several months later, Rosalie marries Sir Thomas Ashby, a wealthy and influential man whom she does not love. Meanwhile, Agnes's father dies and her mother decides to establish a school in the seaside town of A——. From this moment, Agnes spends only six more weeks in Horton, then bids farewell to Mr. Weston and joins her mother in A——. Approximately one year later, she receives a letter from her former student Rosalie inviting her to Ashby Park. When she arrives, Agnes greets a cynical Lady Ashby, now a mother and clearly struggling in a bad marriage. Several days after her return to A——, Agnes encounters Edward Weston walking along the beach. He has secured a position as vicar in a nearby parish. Soon after, the two marry and have children of their own.

Agnes Grey Completely on goodreads.com

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Agnes Grey By Anne Bronte Review Completely on educheer.com

Anne Bronte is often overlooked in favour of her sisters Emily and Charlotte – the former for her unprecedented power, the latter for her daring met with reserve. Anne is in many ways the ‘other’ Bronte – less is known of her, very little survives of her, and less attention is paid her. All we really have of her is her writing – her two novels, ‘The Tenant of Wild fell Hall’ andAgnes Grey’, and numerous poems. Agnes Grey is Anne’s second and last novel – she died aged 28 of the same consumption that killed her brother and sister Emily. It is a placid, sanguine little novel – it contains little of the verve of Wuthering Heights nor the genius of Jane Eyre, but it is in its own way brilliant as a melancholy description of Anne’s own experiences as an educated though poor woman forced into the profession of governance. Agnes, like Anne, is depicted as a poor Pastor’s daughter, and a change in circumstances pushes her happy family into dire straits.